Posted in Bathroom Faucets, Lavatory sinks, Planning, Plumbing, Sinks, Working with a Kitchen Designer

Lead times: How soon do you need it?

There are times when I scratch my head in disbelief when do-it yourself remodeling types do not plan out the project details. Here is my “fly-on-the-wall” experience with a moral at the end of the story.

This weekend I was in a plumbing store with a client, helping with her plumbing selections for an upcoming project. What happened next placed me in a suspended state of disbelief.

A lovely woman walked into the store and explained she needed a lavatory sink and faucet and another faucet for the kitchen. Nothing too unusual about that.
The sales person proceeded to ask the customer the usual questions:
S: Are you looking for a self-rimming sink or under-mount?
C: Self-rimming.

S: Ok. Do you have a preference for wide-spread faucet or single faucet mounted on the deck of the sink or on the counter?” Do you know what your new counter surface will be yet?

C: New granite top. White self-rimming sink. Single hole faucet style mounted on the sink

S: Ok, great we have several options we can look at.”

S: Next, is this for new cabinetry or are you replacing an existing sink and counter and keeping the cabinets?

C: Existing.

S: Alright, do you know what are the existing sink dimensions?

S: “‘What’s that? your existing cabinet is 15 1/2″ front to back?” What’s that? Oh, It’s for your boat?
Oh, I see. Hmm, would you mind if I made a suggestion for an undermount with the single faucet mounted on the rear left or right and not centered. Or we could look at some stainless steel bar sinks that could work. Self rimming sinks with a faucet mounted on the porcelain are just not made that small. We can check the catalogs, but I am pretty sure it is a tall order to fill, I can think of two or three small sinks that may work.

C: No, no, we have that style now, and I really don’t like it at all. I really want to change the style.

S: “How soon do you need it?”

C:
“I am running out of time, I have the granite fabricator coming this Monday and need to get this done today.”

When the customer said she needed it by Monday, the salesperson could have been a deer struck in headlights. That was Saturday with a customer looking for a specialty item she could take with her or have by Monday.


There was a line of people needing help and this customer insisted on going through all the catalogs to prove to herself that the salesperson indeed did not have a sink in stock that met her requirements.

Ideally, when planning a remodel, the cardinal rule is to plan in advance to have all the components on site or in stock ready to ship to you.

Lead times: Not all plumbing stores stock inventory. The specialty plumbing stores carry thousands of models from the plumbing manufacturers they buy from and most will have a lead time from as short as two weeks and as long as 6 weeks for special order items. Chances are, unless you walk into a big box store with product on the shelf ready to buy, there is little chance you will be able to walk away with it the same day.

Check ahead: Not all competing stores carry the same stock. One store may stock Kohler and another down the street may stock Grohe. Call in advance, save yourself the aggravation and wasting gas and time driving all over town. Ask the store manager or head of the dept. what brands they stock or that you can get within the week. Sales people should be able to help you over the phone with these basic questions. Check with your plumber where he buys from. Industry insiders are the best people to ask.

Getting the best service: Don’t abuse a salesperson’s time on the phone. Yes, that’s right. To get the best service and best price keep your questions over the phone, simple and direct. Most will not be able to quote prices, but will be able to take care of your general questions. Ask your salesperson what’s the best time to come in. They want your business, but if you need more handholding in product selection and need to look at every catalog and get a price on multiple styles, showing up during prime time hours means they have to hustle to take care of several customers and cannot focus on you alone. Most salespeople are knowledgeable and want to help. If you find yourself in a busy showroom, write down model #’s. Tell the salesperson you are working on a large project and have several things you need to order. Ask if they can fax or email a quote back to you. If you are willing to be flexible, you can get a lot more in the way of service and probably a better price.

Unfortunately, waiting till the final hour before the plumber arrives, can lead to some very unhappy compromises in your selections.

Better idea yet, if your request is for the unusual and your taste is very selective, your best value is hiring a designer to begin with. A designer has the capability of sourcing out custom features and will be able to recommend the best showrooms to find product. In addition, a designer may be able to recommend a much more efficient floor plan, so that you are not at the mercy of unusual dimensions.

There was more delays in her selection process. Most all the faucets had a red and blue dot indicating hot and cold and she needed one that did not have that. A few more customers came and went, not able to stick it out waiting for service. While the salesperson, (poor chap- he did the best he could in the limited amount of time he had), went off to assist another customer, I felt a little sorry for this lady’s predicament. I whispered quietly to the lady looking for the unusual sink, “that is a very uncommon sink, have you tried a specialty plumbing supplier that carries sinks for marine and rv equipment?”

Answer: “Oh, I didn’t think of that! I had no idea it would be so difficult.”

Moral of the story: When you fail to plan, plan to fail.

Posted in Bathrooms, Builders, Counter tops, Lavatory sinks

Allowances

Tales from remodeling. As I review remodel proposal with clients, I explain this: I do not include allowances for plumbing fixtures, cabinet hardware or tile. The reason is simple, there is a false sense of security built into a proposal, a security bubble that is easily burst when the homeowner visits the plumbing store and starts pricing the fixtures they want on the project. The shock and frustration sets in after one realizes the contractor allowances are not close to being realistic. It can add up to thousands more than what the contractor allowed.

Here is one example from the blog, Dream Home Diaries.

Our builder, John, does not have cheap taste. Quality materials were included in the budget: granite counter tops, composite decking and Hardie Plank siding. Then why, oh why, did he allow such paltry amounts for sinks and faucets?

Paul and I were shocked to learn that John had budgeted only $20 for each bathroom sink —thinking that we would be pleased to use the kind of ugly drop-in sink one finds in spec houses.

Lesson learned: when comparing bids, request the contracting firms bidding on your project to leave out allowances for fixtures. A fixture allowance will never be realistic. Notice that John the contractor allocated funds for quality building materials because he knows his materials. This is what he does day in and day out. On the other hand, he couldn’t possibly guess what every client’s taste level will dictate. In addition, when bidding against other contractors, why would he inflate his proposal with fixture allowances for $250 sinks when a $20 sink will get the job done just the same. Even though the more expensive sink is probably closer to what you may desire.

“Do $20 sinks really exist?”

There was a time when a sink was a sink and that was it! This is not the case today. I suggest you go forth to the plumbing stores, shop, compare and get a sense of your style. Also, what is invaluable is to find a knowledgeable plumbing sales person to work with. Ask your contractor or designer who they recommend. Seasoned plumbing sales people can be a wealth of information on setting you on the right path.

Posted in Bathrooms, Builders, Consumer Protection, Counter tops, Lavatory sinks

Allowances

Tales from remodeling. As I review remodel proposal with clients, I explain this: I do not include allowances for plumbing fixtures, cabinet hardware or tile. The reason is simple, there is a false sense of security built into a proposal, a security bubble that is easily burst when the homeowner visits the plumbing store and starts pricing the fixtures they want on the project. The shock and frustration sets in after one realizes the contractor allowances are not close to being realistic. It can add up to thousands more than what the contractor allowed.

Here is one example from the blog, Dream Home Diaries.

Our builder, John, does not have cheap taste. Quality materials were included in the budget: granite counter tops, composite decking and Hardie Plank siding. Then why, oh why, did he allow such paltry amounts for sinks and faucets?

Paul and I were shocked to learn that John had budgeted only $20 for each bathroom sink —thinking that we would be pleased to use the kind of ugly drop-in sink one finds in spec houses.

Lesson learned: when comparing bids, request the contracting firms bidding on your project to leave out allowances for fixtures. A fixture allowance will never be realistic. Notice that John the contractor allocated funds for quality building materials because he knows his materials. This is what he does day in and day out. On the other hand, he couldn’t possibly guess what every client’s taste level will dictate. In addition, when bidding against other contractors, why would he inflate his proposal with fixture allowances for $250 sinks when a $20 sink will get the job done just the same. Even though the more expensive sink is probably closer to what you may desire.

“Do $20 sinks really exist?”

There was a time when a sink was a sink and that was it! This is not the case today. I suggest you go forth to the plumbing stores, shop, compare and get a sense of your style. Also, what is invaluable is to find a knowledgeable plumbing sales person to work with. Ask your contractor or designer who they recommend. Seasoned plumbing sales people can be a wealth of information on setting you on the right path.