Posted in Blue Kitchens, Peninsula Kitchens, Small Kitchens, Small Space Design, White Kitchens

Favorite Kitchen of the Day

Photo: David Duncan Livingston

This is a beautiful way of handling a small kitchen space. Kitchen designed by City Studios.  I love the slate blue accent color on the island against the white cabinets. Rustic details like the warm-toned recycled antique terra cotta floor. The kitchen’s eco-friendly curved soft ivory concrete countertops are made with concrete – a locally made material – and were given have a patina for an aged look. Other details: energy-efficient appliances, insulated and double-paned windows and door and drawer hardware made from high-quality recycled metal. For the full story visit: SF Gate: Greening the Kitchen
Posted in Blue Kitchens, Historical Influence, Kitchen Sociology, Modern Kitchens, Retro Kitchens, Who Knew

Looking back to look forward in kitchen remodeling.

(photos found at Retro Renovation)

I am a history buff. I love kernels of information so I can go off on a self discovery reading journey. Here is one that got me thinking about times of economic turmoil and how it affects everything we do, everything we buy and even what we eat. Did you know that during the Depression the U.S. Commerce Department proclaimed six standard colors in response to the chaos of various colors that previously existed regarding kitchen equipment? Is this not a wild factoid?

Hold on to that green frying pan. Yes, the US Commerce Dept formed the National Kitchen Modernization Bureau in 1935. White, delphinium blue, royal blue, kitchen green, ivory and red were designated as standard colors. Was the multitude of various colors in kitchen equipment really a problem? Could it be that the drive was to modernize kitchens? Out with the coal and in with gas ranges and electric refrigerators available in six matching colors for a lovely new modern kitchen.

For more information please take a detour to Retro-style suits older home for a very informative and quick read about the reactionary history of appliance colors based on economic hardships.

I found a reference to the National Kitchen Modernization Bureau, pulled from the archives of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal.
Refer to the article: Newspaper’s institute raised bar on homemaking by Nancy Stohs.

Here is a snippet from the article:

In 1930, members could get free advice on kitchen remodeling through the institute’s Home Modernizing Bureau. A program announced in The Journal instructed women to mail in sketches of their woefully old-fashioned kitchens. Some of the old kitchens, along with suggested new designs, would be published in the Real Estate section. Owners of kitchens whose designs were not published would get a personal reply.

An article announcing the opportunity informed readers: “Pantries are out of date, be they large or small, and we must be rid of them to be modern.” Perhaps the pantry could be turned into a breakfast nook, or “a niche for the electric refrigerator.”

As for all those objects displaced from the pantry, “Closed cupboards are the modern, sanitary answer.” But don’t panic: “Building them is no longer a week’s long process.”

A thorough kitchen modernizing should run from $300 to $500, readers were told. “It is not necessary to have all of it done this spring.”

For more reading on Vintage Kitchens, reference the article:
Vintage Kitchens of the 1930’s, 1940’s, 1950’s.

If you are loving all things vintage, then take another detour to Retro Renovations.

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Posted in Blue Kitchens, Historical Influence, Kitchen Sociology, Modern Kitchens, Retro Kitchens, Who Knew

Looking back to look forward in kitchen remodeling.

(photos found at Retro Renovation)

I am a history buff. I love kernels of information so I can go off on a self discovery reading journey. Here is one that got me thinking about times of economic turmoil and how it affects everything we do, everything we buy and even what we eat. Did you know that during the Depression the U.S. Commerce Department proclaimed six standard colors in response to the chaos of various colors that previously existed regarding kitchen equipment? Is this not a wild factoid?

Hold on to that green frying pan. Yes, the US Commerce Dept formed the National Kitchen Modernization Bureau in 1935. White, delphinium blue, royal blue, kitchen green, ivory and red were designated as standard colors. Was the multitude of various colors in kitchen equipment really a problem? Could it be that the drive was to modernize kitchens? Out with the coal and in with gas ranges and electric refrigerators available in six matching colors for a lovely new modern kitchen.

For more information please take a detour to Retro-style suits older home for a very informative and quick read about the reactionary history of appliance colors based on economic hardships.

I found a reference to the National Kitchen Modernization Bureau, pulled from the archives of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinal.
Refer to the article: Newspaper’s institute raised bar on homemaking by Nancy Stohs.

Here is a snippet from the article:

In 1930, members could get free advice on kitchen remodeling through the institute’s Home Modernizing Bureau. A program announced in The Journal instructed women to mail in sketches of their woefully old-fashioned kitchens. Some of the old kitchens, along with suggested new designs, would be published in the Real Estate section. Owners of kitchens whose designs were not published would get a personal reply.

An article announcing the opportunity informed readers: “Pantries are out of date, be they large or small, and we must be rid of them to be modern.” Perhaps the pantry could be turned into a breakfast nook, or “a niche for the electric refrigerator.”

As for all those objects displaced from the pantry, “Closed cupboards are the modern, sanitary answer.” But don’t panic: “Building them is no longer a week’s long process.”

A thorough kitchen modernizing should run from $300 to $500, readers were told. “It is not necessary to have all of it done this spring.”

For more reading on Vintage Kitchens, reference the article:
Vintage Kitchens of the 1930’s, 1940’s, 1950’s.

If you are loving all things vintage, then take another detour to Retro Renovations.

###
Posted in Back splashes, Blue Kitchens, Paint

Blue is the New black

Patricia Gray has mentioned Blue is the New Black at her blog . Blue remains timeless. It can be bold or quiet. I noted in an earlier blog that blue remains a popular color even the kitchen. Color communicates who we are. Bold colors for a free spirit. Demure colors for soft spoken types. It can also transmit a vibe. Do you feel best when at the beach, or are you invigorated by world travels and need to be surrounded with more exotic colors and elements?

Back splashes can be an opportunity to create a vibe for your space. Hard surfaces can play off of soft surfaces such as cushions & fabric.

From the most bold…

Shown here, variegated handmade glass tiles. Reminiscent of the ocean, by Erin Adams through Ann Sacks. Interior Design by Frank Roop and Dalia Kitchen Design.

Large Zen Weave in mottled blue, Ann Sacks tile


To the fanciful formal…

An interlocking oval in hand cut glass tiles in Ann Sacks silver and mineral presents itself as a whimsical yet formal pattern.

To the invigorating…

Ann Sacks Lake Garda Ceramic Art Tile in multiple hues of blue.

…and then there is the most subtle forms of blue.

Kitchen floor is bluestone with a sky blue fabric pallette. With 22 ft. ceilings the blue recedes. Designer David Klienberg, House Beautiful, April 2008.

From the most vibrant to the most subtle shades, blue is accepted everywhere.

Posted in Back splashes, Blue Kitchens, Paint

Blue is the New black

Patricia Gray has mentioned Blue is the New Black at her blog . Blue remains timeless. It can be bold or quiet. I noted in an earlier blog that blue remains a popular color even the kitchen. Color communicates who we are. Bold colors for a free spirit. Demure colors for soft spoken types. It can also transmit a vibe. Do you feel best when at the beach, or are you invigorated by world travels and need to be surrounded with more exotic colors and elements?

Back splashes can be an opportunity to create a vibe for your space. Hard surfaces can play off of soft surfaces such as cushions & fabric.

From the most bold…

Shown here, variegated handmade glass tiles. Reminiscent of the ocean, by Erin Adams through Ann Sacks. Interior Design by Frank Roop and Dalia Kitchen Design.

Large Zen Weave in mottled blue, Ann Sacks tile


To the fanciful formal…

An interlocking oval in hand cut glass tiles in Ann Sacks silver and mineral presents itself as a whimsical yet formal pattern.

To the invigorating…

Ann Sacks Lake Garda Ceramic Art Tile in multiple hues of blue.

…and then there is the most subtle forms of blue.

Kitchen floor is bluestone with a sky blue fabric pallette. With 22 ft. ceilings the blue recedes. Designer David Klienberg, House Beautiful, April 2008.

From the most vibrant to the most subtle shades, blue is accepted everywhere.

Posted in Blue Kitchens, Paint

Blue Kitchens

Blue has always been a popular color. Do you have a favorite color and want to incorporate in your kitchen without looking overdone, see how blue accents these wonderful kitchens.

Elegant carved cabinetry in this Connecticut kitchen take us straight into French chateau country. click here. House Beautiful.


Here is the ultimate collector’s fantasy, with beautiful blue cabinets to show off pottery, and a hand-carved island from France.
As seen in House Beautiful. Click here.

The contemporary Quimper dinnerware is still made in the original factory in France. The cabinets were custom-designed by Joanne Hudson and built by Downsview. A collection of tea cozies is tucked on top. Old Italian apothecary jars are lined up on the marble countertop from Vermont Quarries. Featured in House Beautiful January 2007 issue.

Kitchen from Electrolux.com

Posted in Blue Kitchens, Paint

Blue Kitchens

Blue has always been a popular color. Do you have a favorite color and want to incorporate in your kitchen without looking overdone, see how blue accents these wonderful kitchens.

Elegant carved cabinetry in this Connecticut kitchen take us straight into French chateau country. click here. House Beautiful.


Here is the ultimate collector’s fantasy, with beautiful blue cabinets to show off pottery, and a hand-carved island from France.
As seen in House Beautiful. Click here.

The contemporary Quimper dinnerware is still made in the original factory in France. The cabinets were custom-designed by Joanne Hudson and built by Downsview. A collection of tea cozies is tucked on top. Old Italian apothecary jars are lined up on the marble countertop from Vermont Quarries. Featured in House Beautiful January 2007 issue.

Kitchen from Electrolux.com