Posted in Bead Board, Kitchen Storage, Kitchens Don'ts

Kitchen Do’s and Don’ts:Series # 3

Let’s get busy. Not.
It started off with good proportions. Can you have too much of a good thing? Yes. It’s time to edit. Bead board should be limited. It’s too busy on the drawers, doors and valance. The leaded glass is pretty, and would have been prettier without all the bead board. The window is trimmed out in large stained wood casing. Again, too much. Every detail is pretty unto itself, but all together it is too much to take in. The island is drop dead gorgeous!

Here is a good example of bead board well done. Base doors but not the drawer fronts. Two wall doors have clear glass. Only the tall doors have bead board. The bead board is repeated in the island end panels only.

Here is another good example using bead board. Drawer fronts are flat. Only the doors have bead board. Addition of glass door cabinets breaks it up for visual interest. The hood also has the bead board. A big don’t in this one is the use of wine storage above the refrigerator. Unless you intentionally meant to cook your wine, never put wine here, the hottest spot in the kitchen. The dedicated doggy dining area is adorable!

Posted in Bead Board, Kitchens Don'ts

Kitchen Do’s and Don’ts:Series # 3

Let’s get busy. Not.
It started off with good proportions. Can you have too much of a good thing? Yes. It’s time to edit. Bead board should be limited. It’s too busy on the drawers, doors and valance. The leaded glass is pretty, and would have been prettier without all the bead board. The window is trimmed out in large stained wood casing. Again, too much. Every detail is pretty unto itself, but all together it is too much to take in. The island is drop dead gorgeous!

Here is a good example of bead board well done. Base doors but not the drawer fronts. Two wall doors have clear glass. Only the tall doors have bead board. The bead board is repeated in the island end panels only.

Here is another good example using bead board. Drawer fronts are flat. Only the doors have bead board. Addition of glass door cabinets breaks it up for visual interest. The hood also has the bead board. A big don’t in this one is the use of wine storage above the refrigerator. Unless you intentionally meant to cook your wine, never put wine here, the hottest spot in the kitchen. The dedicated doggy dining area is adorable!

Posted in Bead Board, Cabinets, Paint, Planning, Projects

Contrasting Custom Interiors

I have a client who found the most beautiful shade of green for her walls. She asked:

“Can we use this color in the interior bead board back of my glass door cabinets?”

When selecting a custom contrasting interior paint color for your cabinet order keep in mind these pre- planning points.
1. Plan in advance of your cabinet order placement. A special color matched sample will have to be generated and submitted back for your approval. Custom color matched samples should be arranged before a cabinet order is submitted so that the order is not delayed while the color match and approval are pending.

2. Test your paint color on a solid wood sample. Preferably on the same wood species you are planning for your cabinet order.

3. Plan on additional fees to your order. Paint premium fees from the factory usually rate 10%- 25% more to an order. When submitting your own custom color, add to your costs the following: Development fees, Custom Color Fees, Custom Multi Step Fees which can add 5 or 12% to your order.

4. Before going to the additional expense of custom color, check with your cabinet sales person to see if there is a close match that would suit your needs for the project.

When I see a custom color request, it is usually done as a paint request, not a stain. Stains are easier to match with the range of stain colors available through cabinet manufacturers. Paint colors with cabinet manufacturers are limited. They may offer Forrest Green and Pistachio Green which are few and far between that perfect shade you are trying to achieve. “Contrasting interior color” is usually requested in a wall cabinet with doors routed for glass, or bead board interior backs to complement or go along with a paint color being carried through on the walls.

Why go to the expense of having the factory paint it? If very careful, “Do-it-your-selfers” can attempt painting small portions of interior back walls of cabinets or loose bead board back and install into the cabinet. Be careful though, if painting over already painted material, you could wind up with a mess, if you don’t pre plan by priming before painting. What a mess! You do not want to wind up with a painted surface that peels right off. Painting is not for the faint of heart. If you say you want the interior unfinished, manufacturers will not warranty unfinished cabinets, nor ship isolated unfinished parts of a cabinet.

Mostly, the reason that most are willing to pay the fee is that there is no better finish than a professional factory finish. No hassle, no mess, no re-do’s with local painters. It is done, and ready for installation!

If a homeowner hands the paint can to the unsuspecting cabinet installer, be prepared. Cabinet installers do not paint unless a pre-arrangement has been made in advanced. Most will want you to make arrangements with professional painters for finish work.