Posted in Cabinets, Counter tops, Kitchen Storage, Projects, Sinks

Custom Built

Here is a picture of a sink base my client and I created to solve the corner sink problem of too much wasted space.

The typical corner sink base the client had before was angled in such a way that it pushed the sink base farther into the room wasting a lot of space in front of and behind the sink.


The redesign I worked on with the homeowner, allowed for a 46″ base cabinet, two sets of bifold doors allowing for the sink to be set back further into the corner than before. Hoping for the largest sink possible, we used a fairly large Blancowave 37″ stainless Steel Sink.

One glitch was minor; the doors arrived with piano hinges.


We replaced them with concealed hinges. The outcome was successful and the customer is enjoying her corner sink now more thank before.

We also got rid of the 15″ trash compactor and replaced it with 18″ double trash cans to the left of the sink, thus making more usable counter space between the cook top and the sink.

Can you guess? The 18″ three drawer base is disguising the 18″ trash base. The top drawer is operable. The two drawers false panels hiding the pull out trash cans. That was a clever trick we used to give the appearance of drawers to match the drawers to the left of the cook top. The client is big on symmetry.

This project is an example of how ideas evolve as we work our way through the design. When the client first came to see me, the idea was to remove huge wasted space of the corner sink. Too much unusable space behind the sink and too much space projecting into the room. The client was so tired of this space that they were willing to place half of the sink into an L shape corner in order to reclaim the inches for usable counter and base cabinet use. The problem I saw in their initial concept is that we are replacing one awkward configuration for another. Another aspect of the design; originally the idea was to keep the 20 year old Thermador oven that still worked great! The problem: it was in a spot in the kitchen that would not work well with the new peninsula we wanted to add for more counter space. Leaving the oven in the original location would create a barrier or “walk a around” from the dining room. Not a good idea. We placed a movable cart in front of the pantry to show a possible location of the peninsula. We rejected this and placed the peninsula off the opposite wall.

We decided to move the oven to the opposite wall of the cook top, but because the oven was vented, Mrs. R. finally warmed up to the idea of a new Thermador when we found out moving the old Thermador meant additional costs with a new roof jack to vent the old oven. The second concept we decided to nix, was the placement of the refrigerator in the corner. As with the old corner sink, the refrigerator was decidedly too big to be placed on an angle. Instead we jettisoned the pantry to the old desk area in the kitchen, which was not used as a desk at all by the client. We found the depth of the desk area worked well so that we could place a pantry on one side and a glass fronted curio cabinet accessible from the hallway. Voila! A space that gave us a bonus storage.

In the redesigned space: oven and pantry moved, refrigerator inched over; the sink stayed in the corner with a more tailored fit with a custom cabinet. We also custom built the space to house the GE Profile Refrigerator.

It was important we put back simple key features inside the cabinets. Tray dividers are essential.

The “Tray Stay” is a Omega National Product, made in maple veneer. Installed in u channel brackets with screws. Fastened into multiple locations. Great feature. You decide what span you need between the dividers.


Notice in the “after photo” the bump out in the side panels and cabinet above the refer. to allow for a 28″ case depth refrigerator. The before shot shows the massiveness of the old refrigerator. The new refrigerator is still 25.5 cu. ft.

Before: After:

We also liked the idea of “side lights” on the glass door cabinet.


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Author:

Laurie Burke, connected to the design and construction industry since 1996. A seasoned residential kitchen and bath design specialist , Laurie has designed thousands of kitchens & baths as well as other cabinetry projects requiring technical precision in design drafting utilizing state of the art 2020 software for creating accurate plans and elevations. Through on- going product knowledge training and a desire to always stay current with an evolving marketplace, Laurie Burke maintains a strong command of knowing the appropriate Fit & Finish materials required for a residential remodel to meet the budget, the timeline of a project and a client's need for a finished product that meets their satisfaction. Kitchen Designer by trade, foodie, techie, weekend traveler for fun. For more information contact me at burkeKBdesign@gmail.com http://laurieburke.houzz.com

8 thoughts on “Custom Built

  1. I luv your corner sink…very good idea. Im trying to put my refrigerator in a corner and Im coming to the conclusion that its a spacewaster to a certain degree…has anyone designed any fridges in a corner?? Thanks…Steve

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  2. I really like the plywood tray dividers. We just remodeled our kitchen and I want to add wood tray dividers, not wire ones.Can you please provide me with any instructions for attaching the dividers to the cabinet. Daryl Probetts

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  3. I am a first time cabinet builder and this is the best corner sink idea and drawing I have seen. The space I have to work with is smaller so the sink I will be using is 25″ x 22″ x 6.5″. So I am trying to calculate how I could reduce the size of this cabinet so that the overall Left and Right side lengths are not 46″ but rather 32″-36″. My question is – do I simply reduce all the measurements on your cabinet drawing by the correct % – which I assume would be the percentage difference between 46″ and 36″?

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    1. You could probably reduce the dimensions. I would watch out for hinge limitation though on a smaller door. Template it out in full scale with butcher paper or cardboard to see how it works.

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